Day 11

Flames of fury http://in.reuters.com/news/top-news

Flames of fury http://in.reuters.com/news/top-news

                          Candlelight vigil in Dehli        http://in.reuters.com/news/pictures/slideshow?                               articleId=INRTR3BYF0#a=105

                          Candlelight vigil in Dehli        http://in.reuters.com/news/pictures/slideshow?                               articleId=INRTR3BYF0#a=105

I was going to write about my experiences today and save a post like this for the last day, but decided I’d write about this. 

On my Christmas post I mentioned the girl who was attacked on a moving bus. For the past two weeks she was fighting for her life and just two nights ago she passed away. Sometimes I wonder when it was that the world started spinning in reverse. When was it that man decided it was okay to kill another? Worst of all, when was it that man started to blame one another? I could go on and on because I just don’t understand. Why something like this happens to a 23 year old girl in India and Indians in the United States point their fingers at India and say “get your act together, India…fix these problems”. But isn’t it our parents, grandparents, great grandparents and ancestors who make up India? Isn’t it our blood and the culture we brought to the United States that makes up India? So technically isn’t it us who are supposed to help fix these problems? 

For those of us who have been fortunate enough to grow up and get an education in the United States, we’ve automatically caught people’s attention in India. No matter what we say, they’re going to listen to us. They want to know how we live, what we do, and if we remember our culture. What they should know about us is this: we haven’t forgotten our language, our culture, or our country. That we educate ourselves and that they should too, to bring themselves as well as India ahead. 

When I started coming to India, I hated being treated differently. I was given special treatment and people always stared at me, but then I realized I could use it to my advantage. The one thing I saw was that I would start to say something and everyone’s eyes were on me. I could say anything and they would be listening. For example, during this trip, I started talking more and more and what happened? People listened. The elderly people started listening to me because they were surprised I knew how to speak just like them. The kids started listening to me because they were intrigued to hear what I had to say. I visited the poor, told them to educate their children and told the kids to go to go to school. Every time I would say something they would nod and agree over and over again. I’m not sure if anything I said made a difference, but my point is that we’re just as responsible (for anything) as the Indians living in India. Even though we’re not in India and can’t directly stop something like this from happening, we have the power to prevent something else from happening. 

What do you guys think? How do you think we can make a change? 
Email me at rina@aahanaindia.org or write in the comment section with your opinions! I'd love to hear your thoughts!